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Displaying items by tag: Marcus Aurelius

The Logic of Faith

All those things at which thou wishest to arrive by a circuitous road thou canst have now if thou dost not refuse them to thyself. —Marcus Aurelius. Every act of our lives is an act of faith, based upon experience. We take food and drink into our mouths without thought…
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Hidden Treasures

Give thyself time to learn something new and good, and cease to be whirled around. —Marcus Aurelius Plato claimed that all knowledge was reminiscence. It is a curious fact that the universal belief of the world anticipates in the next stage of existence a complete provision for all individual wants,…
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Precious Thoughts

Manners give the whole form and colour to our lives.—Burke Silence, when nothing need be said, is the eloquence of discretion. —Bovee By patience and perseverance the mulberry leaf becomes silk. —Chinese Proverb He who is firm in will moulds the world to himself. —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Speak clearly…
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Good Deeds

The man who with a heart of loveDoeth an action good and kindFor mercy's sake, expecting nought,Great recompense will find."For he who doeth good to oneOf these my brethren counted leastTo me the deed hath also done"—Thus spake our great High Priest.Were only deeds of love performed,Their mingled essences would…
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Spiritual Mathematics

That which is not good for the swarm, Neither is it good for the bee.—Marcus Aurelius Unselfishness is freedom. It is a state of mind that looks abroad. It does not need, however, to seek for itself the gratification of public activities. The reputation of “unselfishness" often suggests a subtle…
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Editorial

The Light of ReasonMarch 1906Published MonthlyEdited by James Allen Vol. VIII. March 1st, 1906 No. 3 The "Bryngoleu Cookery Book" was expected to be ready by the 1st February, but an unlooked-for delay in the printing of the book prevented its publication until the 9th, which explains the reason why…
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Mental Microbes

It is not fit that I should give myself pain, for I have never intentionally given pain even to another. —Marcus Aurelius. Small annoyances are the seeds of disease. We cannot afford to entertain them. They are the bacteria,—the germs that make serious disturbance in the system, and prepare the…
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The Use of Daydreams

It is somewhat of a pleasant surprise to find in the Autobiography of a philosopher like Herbert Spencer the confession that ‘castle-building,’ so often condemned, is in his opinion of great practical utility. Day dreams were to him the beginnings of a Constructive Philosophy for which the world is today…
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Live for the Best (Poem)

What is the form your life presents? Has it some sweet attraction That tells enquiring souls around Of earnest thought and action? We sing life’s song from day to day—What is the song you render? Is it a gloomy thoughtless lay, Or is it bright and tender? Your song may be a song…
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Pillow Thoughts—Or, Mental Sleeping Draughts

Prescription—To be taken nightly. Today I have got out of all trouble; or rather, I have cast out all trouble, for it was not outside but within, and in my opinions. —Marcus Aurelius It is well to acquaint ourselves with the laws of storms in the domain of the spirit,…
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From Dan to Beersheba

Milestones in a Psychic Pilgrimage Look within. Within is the fountain of good, and it will ever bubble up if thou wilt ever dig. —Marcus Aurelius. In the usual reaction which follows a new and radical discovery of truth, the first impulse of the student is to distrust all that…
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On Meditation

Meditation is to the mind what sunshine and air are to plants—the necessity for growth. Earth and water alone will not produce plants, learning and memorizing alone will not give wisdom; into the inner chambers of the mind the sunshine and air of the spiritual world must penetrate, and he…
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Insomnia

Dwell up there in the simple and noble regions of thy life. Obey thy heart and thou shalt reproduce the foreworld again.— Emerson. Who of us has not suffered from sleepless nights? The subjective life in which, as Macdonald so quaintly suggests, our souls go home to their father's house…
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