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The Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science

The Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science

James Allen reviewed this book in his May, 1904 edition of The Light of Reason, saying:

Mr. Troward possesses the rare and unique ability of presenting the most profoundly abstruse metaphysics in uninvolved phraseology. He accomplishes this difficult task largely by his use of apt comparisons, aided by a keenly synthetical quality. The book consists of thirteen chapters, which fit each other consecutively, like the steps of a ladder, the writer's object being to take his reader along by easy stages, and this he does with admirable skill. In the first chapter, "Spirit and Matter," he lucidly defines these terms, summing up his argument thus briefly:—"The distinctive quality of Spirit is Thought, and...the distinctive quality of matter is Form." In his second chapter he explains how "The Higher Mode of Intelligence controls the Lower," and the third chapter, "The Unity of Spirit," deals with the basic unity of all things. He then passes on to a consideration of "The Subjective and Objective Mind," which he deals with at considerable length in several chapters. Indeed, the whole book is really an elucidation of the self-transforming power which he regards as the distinctive quality of the subjective mind, its keynote being "All things whatsoever ye pray and ask for, believe that ye have received them, and ye shall receive them." The chapters on "Causes and Conditions," "Intuition," "Healing," and "The Will," are all highly instructive and equally good. The book is a storehouse of rich intellectual thought, and all its metaphysical statements have a directly practical and ethical application.

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Foreword

This book contains the substance of a course of lectures recently given by the writer in the Queen Street Hall, Edinburgh. Its purpose is to indicate the Natural Principles governing the relation between Mental Action and Material Conditions, and thus to afford the student an intelligible starting point for the practical study of the subject.…
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Spirit and Matter

In commencing a course of lectures on Mental Science, it is somewhat difficult for the lecturer to fix upon the best method of opening the subject. It can be approached from many sides, each with some peculiar advantage of its own; but, after careful deliberation, it appears to me that, for the purpose of the…
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The Higher Mode of Intelligence Controls the Lower

We have seen that the descent from personality, as we know it in ourselves, to matter, as we know it under what we call inanimate forms, is a gradual descent in the scale of intelligence from that mode of being which is able to realize its own will-power as a capacity for originating new trains…
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The Unity of the Spirit

We have now paved the way for understanding what is meant by "the unity of the spirit." In the first conception of spirit as the underlying origin of all things we see a universal substance which, at this stage, is not differentiated into any specific forms. This is not a question of some bygone time,…
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Subjective and Objective Mind

Up to this point it has been necessary to lay the foundations of the science by the statement of highly abstract general principles which we have reached by purely metaphysical reasoning. We now pass on to the consideration of certain natural laws which have been established by a long series of experiments and observations, the…
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Further Considerations Regarding Subjective and Objective Mind

An intelligent consideration of the phenomena of hypnotism will show us that what we call the hypnotic state is the normal state of the subjective mind. It always conceives of itself in accordance with some suggestion conveyed to it, either consciously or unconsciously to the mode of objective mind which governs it, and it gives…
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The Law of Growth

Acorrect understanding of the law of growth is of the highest importance to the student of Mental Science. The great fact to be realized regarding Nature is that it is natural. We may pervert the order of Nature, but it will prevail in the long run, returning, as Horace says, by the back door even…
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Receptivity

In order to lay the foundations for practical work, the student must endeavor to get a clear conception of what is meant by the intelligence of undifferentiated spirit. We want to grasp the idea of intelligence apart from individuality, an idea which is rather apt to elude us until we grow accustomed to it. It…
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Reciprocal Action of the Universal and Individual Minds

It must be admitted that the foregoing considerations bring us to the borders of theological speculation, but the student must bear in mind that as a Mental Scientist it is his business to regard even the most exalted spiritual phenomena from a purely scientific standpoint, which is that of the working of a universal natural…
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Causes and Conditions

The expression "relative first cause" has been used in the last section to distinguish the action of the creative principle in the individual mind from Universal First Cause on the one hand and from secondary causes on the other. As it exists in us, primary causation is the power to initiate a train of causation…
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Intuition

We have seen that the subjective mind is amenable to suggestion by the objective mind; but there is also an action of the subjective mind upon the objective. The individual's subjective mind is his own innermost self, and its first care is the maintenance of the individuality of which it is the foundation; and since…
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Healing

The subject of healing has been elaborately treated by many writers and fully deserves all the attention that has been given to it, but the object of these lectures is rather to ground the student in those general principles on which all conscious use of the creative power of thought is based, than to lay…
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The Will

The Will is of such primary importance that the student should be on his guard against any mistake as to the position which it holds in the mental economy. Many writers and teachers insist on will-power as though that were the creative faculty. No doubt intense will-power can evolve certain external results, but like all…
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In Touch With Sub-Conscious Mind

The preceding pages have made the student in some measure aware of the immense importance of our dealings with the sub-conscious mind. Our relation to it, whether on the scale of the individual or the universal, is the key to all that we are or ever can be. In its unrecognized working it is the…
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The Body

Some students find it difficult to realize that mental action can produce any real effect upon material substance; but if this is not possible there is no such thing as Mental Science, the purpose of which is to produce improved conditions both of body and environment, so that the ultimate manifestation aimed at is always…
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The Soul

Having now obtained a glimpse of the adaptation of the physical organism to the action of the mind we must next realize that the mind itself is an organism which is in like manner adapted to the action of a still higher power, only here the adaptation is one of mental faculty. As with other…
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The Spirit

What must the Supreme All-originating Spirit be in itself? That is the question before us. Let us start with one fact regarding it about which we cannot have any possible doubt—it is creative. If it were not creative nothing could come into existence; therefore we know that its purpose, or Law of Tendency, must be…
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