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The World Beautiful

The World Beautiful

James Allen reviewed this book saying "In The World Beautiful, she is inspiring to a remarkable degree, so much so that those people who are inclined to "get below the mark" would do well to keep it by them as a spiritual tonic. In this respect, the following brief quotation will be sufficient to show its value:—"Worry is a state of spiritual corrosion. A trouble either can be remedied, or it cannot. If it can be, then set about it; if it cannot be, dismiss it from consciousness, or bear it so bravely that it may become transfigured to a blessing." There is a sweetness and charm and strength about the whole book that renders it unique, and written by a woman, there are portions of it that are of great value to women; though, of course, not exclusively so. The extract which we reprint from this work on another page of this journal, will give our readers an idea of its nature.

Dedication

'Tis heaven alone that is given away;'Tis only God may be had for the asking.—Lowell To the memory and the ever-living presence of Phillips Brooks, Bishop of Massachusetts and 'the friend and aider of all who would live in the spirit.' These papers are reverently inscribed by Lilian Whiting.
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The Duty of Happiness

The Fairest enchants me,The Mighty commands me,Saying, 'Stand in thy placeUp and Eastward turn thy Face,So thou attend the enriching fateWhich none can stay, and none accelerate.—Emerson The World Beautiful After all, it rests with ourselves as to whether we shall live in a World Beautiful. It depends little on external scenery, little on those…
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Nectar and Ambrosia

Nectar and Ambrosia should not be regarded as refreshment sacred only to festive occasions, but as human nature's daily food. It is the natural sustenance of life, not a luxury for an occasional holiday. It is the initial business and purpose of life to be happy; and, lest the moralist should object to this as…
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Believe in the Wings

My brother Charles, among the difficulties of our early ministry, used to say, "If the Lord would give me wings, I would fly,"' related John Wesley. 'I used to answer, "If the Lord bids me fly, I would trust Him for the wings."' A more perfect commentary on life than that contained in these words…
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The Vision and the Splendor

The Legend Beautiful is familiar The Vision and to all—that scene depicted by the poet's pen where the monk in his cell beheld the Vision, and questioned whether he should go to give the daily alms to the beggars at the convent gate, or should stay. Would the Vision there remain?Would the Vision come again?Then…
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The Enlargement of Relations

No soul can ever truly seeAnother's highest, noblest partSave through the sweet philosophyAnd loving wisdom of the heart. I see the feet that fain would climb;You, but the steps that turn astray.I see the soul, unharmed, sublime;You, but the garment and the clay.—Phoebe Cary The enlargement of social relations depends far less on opportunity than…
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Friends Discovered, Not Made

Friends in any true and abiding sense, therefore, are in the nature of a discovery; but when discovered, it is because of a predestined spiritual relation that compels recognition and which transcends and dominates all temporary and external conditions or circumstances. Friendship of this order is as eternal as the spirit itself. It is a…
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A Psychological Problem

Liking and not liking people is logical a condition whose causes refuse to be analyzed. It is a result that is, seemingly, independent of the usual processes, and like the fragrance of the rose is to be perceived and enjoyed, but not reduced to exact analysis. You do not like people because they are, specifically,…
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The Supreme Luxury of Life

After all, say what we will, the one supreme luxury of life of Life is sympathetic companionship. Friendship is a comprehensive term, and to a considerable degree comprises those relations of friendly feeling which are given, which should be given, freely and widely, but which do not, necessarily, involve the element of companionship. One may…
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Our Communion With the Unseen

The more enlightened view of death, considering it as one of the several significant events in life; the supreme experience, perhaps, and still as one phase among others—this more enlightened view reveals to us the permanence of all sympathetic social relations, and of the closer communion of friendship. The intercourse is continued in just the…
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Exclusiveness and Inclusiveness

Our Social Salvation We are not strong by our power to penetrate, but by our relatedness.The world is enlarged for us, not by new objects, but by finding more affinities and potencies in those we have...It is not talent, but sensibility which is best: talent confines, but the central life puts us in relation to…
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Through Scorning Nothing

There is a profound truth at the bottom of Mrs. Browning's assertion that— Poets become suchThrough scorning nothing. There is no quality which is more corrosive to all true life or endeavor than that of contempt. Nor does it spring from any superiority of character or gifts, however fondly one who manifests it may lay…
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The Woman of the World

The woman of the world and the worldly woman wear their rue world, with a difference. Between them there is a great gulf fixed—a gulf that separates worldly knowledge from worldly ambition. Worldly knowledge is desirable; worldly ambition is despicable. The one may be, and should be, noble; the other could, by no trick of…
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The Potency of Charm

The quality of charm is the most potent of any characteristic of humanity and the least definable. It is that which is most swiftly perceived and most impossible to describe. It is neither the direct result of learning or goodness or accomplishments, nor any specific gift or grace, and still it includes the essential element…
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Fine Souls and Fine Society

Emerson's assertion that 'it is the fine souls who serve us, and not what is called fine society,' is a refreshing assurance to fall back upon; for when life degenerates into an idolatry of the senses, a worship of material good, and is controlled only by the sovereignty of selfishness, its divine aim is irrevocably…
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Vice and Advice

Lotus-Eating I walked on, musing with myselfOn life and art, and whether, after all,A larger metaphysics might not helpOur physics—a completer poetryAdjust our daily life and vulgar wantsMore fully than the special outside plansPreferred by modern thinkers, as they thoughtThe bread of man indeed made all his life.—From "Aurora Leigh" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning Some…
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One’s Own Way

There is perhaps no trait in human nature that is more under the ban of a general and by no means concealed aversion than that which is vaguely designated as the liking to have one's own way. It is held up to protest, to scorn, to denunciation. Yet after all, what is better? Another person's…
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Writing in Sympathetic Ink

It is the temperament which is willing to take risks that is the temperament of success, and that reads the messages written in sympathetic ink. Its success may not, invariably, be the success of personal gain, or of personal gratification; it may even come in the guise of sacrifice and of spending and being spent…
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Success as a Fine Art

What boots it—what the soldier's mail,Unless he conquer and prevail?—From "Fate" by Ralph Waldo Emerson Success in life is too largely and far too generally considered in the nature of special gifts or of exceptional good fortune, of some unusual provision or combination in some way, rather than as the simple duty and the obligation…
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A Common Experience

There are few writers in any large city who do not receive more or less (and usually more) notes running somewhat after this fashion: '...Pardon this intrusion;...but believing that you are a friend to all novices in literature, we venture to ask if a young lady who is desirous of entering into active literary (journalistic)…
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Intimations and Promptings

We see but half the causes of our deedsSeeking them wholly in the outer life,And heedless of the encircling spirit world,Which, though unseen, is felt, and sows in usAll germs of pure and worldwide purposes.—Lowell But whoso answers not God's earliest callForfeits or dulls that faculty supremeOf lying open to his genius,Which makes the wise…
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Through Struggle to Achievement

And he who flagg'd not in the earthly strife,From strength to strength advancing—only he,His soul well-knit, and all his battles won,Mounts, and that hardly, to eternal life.—Matthew Arnold In the life of everyone who has really tried to make his life something finer and nobler and more impressive in its influence than a mere existence…
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A Question of the Day

There is no question but that the atmosphere in which we live is magnetic, or, at least, capable of being made so, —of being so charged with spiritual magnetism that all outwards evens are not only modified, but are even determined by this all-pervading force. Is it in Festus that we find the lines— There…
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The Law of Overcoming

There is, perhaps, no one term of whose significance is less truly understood than that of overcoming. When Jesus said,' In the world ye shall have tribulation; but be of good cheer: I have overcome the world,' there was something meant quite different from its commonly received interpretation. Many persons have translated it to imply…
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In Newness of Life

With those elect,Who seem not to compete or strive,But with the foremost still arrive,Prevailing still:Spirits with whom the stars conniveTo work their will.—From "In Laleham Churchyard" by William Watson There are few phrases that bear within them more inherent buoyancy and exhilaration than that, 'to rise in newness of life.' It is a thought to…
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The Heavenly Vision

I was not disobedient unto the Heavenly Vision.—Acts 26:19 There are few words that so thrill one with a sense of new and diviner possibilities, that are so deeply freighted with the positiveness of the higher life, as these. They comprehend all the greatness which results from the entire spiritualization of thought, all that glow…
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