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The Journal of John Woolman

The Journal of John Woolman

This book was published in 1774. Allen reviewed this book in his May 1902 edition of The Light of Reason, saying:
This is the autobiography of a man who, whilst living a comparatively obscure and humble life, so impressed his sterling moral and spiritual qualities upon his generation, as to have become the initial instrument in the abolition of American slavery, the great beauty of his character, and the full significance of his work not being fully recognized until long after his death. A powerfully written introduction by John Greenleaf Whittier, should be sufficient to commend the book, the diction of which is sweet and simple. 

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Chapter 1

1720-1742 His Birth and ParentageSome Account of the Operations of Divine Grace on his Mind in his YouthHis first Appearance in the MinistryAnd his Considerations, while young, on the Keeping of Slaves I have often felt a Motion of Love to leave some Hints in Writing of my Experience of the Goodness of God; and…
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Chapter 2

1743-1748 His first Journey, on a religious Visit, into East-Jersey, in Company with Abraham FarringtonHis Thoughts on merchandizing, and his learning a TradeHis second Journey, with Isaac Andrews, into Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and North CarolinaHis third Journey, with Peter Andrews, through Part of West and East-JerseySome Account of his Sister Elizabeth, and her DeathHis fourth…
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Chapter 3

1749-1756 His MarriageThe Death of his FatherHis Journeys into the upper Part of New-Jersey, and afterwards into PennsylvaniaConsiderations on keeping Slaves, and his Visits to the Families of Friends at several Times and PlacesAn Epistle from the General MeetingHis Journey to Long-IslandConsiderations on Trading, and on the Use of spirituous Liquors and costly ApparelAnd his…
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Chapter 4

1757, 1758 His Journey to Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and North-Carolina: Considerations on the State of Friends there; and the Exercise he was under in travelling among those so generally concerned in keeping Slaves: With some Observations in Conversation, at several Times, on this SubjectHis Epistle to Friends at New-Garden and Cane-CreekHis Thoughts on the Neglect…
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Chapter 5

1757, 1758 Considerations on the Payment of a Tax laid for Carrying on the War against the IndiansMeetings of the Committee of the Yearly Meeting at PhiladelphiaSome Notes on Thomas à Kempis and John HussThe present Circumstances of Friends in Pennsylvania and New Jersey very Different from those of our PredecessorsThe Drafting of the Militia…
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Chapter 6

1758, 1759 Visit to the Quarterly Meetings in Chester CountyJoins Daniel Stanton and John Scarborough in a Visit to such as kept Slaves thereSome Observations on the Conduct which those should maintain who speak in Meetings for DisciplineMore Visits to such as kept Slaves, and to Friends near SalemAccount of the Yearly Meeting in the…
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Chapter 7

1760 Visit, in Company with Samuel Eastburn, to Long Island, Rhode Island, Boston, etc. Remarks on the Slave-Trade at Newport; also on LotteriesSome Observations on the Island of Nantucket. Having, for some Time past, felt a Sympathy in my Mind with Friends Eastward, I opened my Concern in our Monthly-meeting; and, obtaining a Certificate, set…
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Chapter 8

1761, 1762 His Visits to Pennsylvania, Shrewsbury, and SquanHis publishing the second Part of Considerations on keeping NegroesHis visiting the Families of Friends of Ancocas and Mount-Holly MeetingsHis Visits to the Indians at Wehaloosing on the River Susquehannah Having felt my Mind drawn toward a Visit to a few Meetings in Pennsylvania, I was very…
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Chapter 9

1763-1769 His religious Conversation with a Company met to see the Tricks of a JugglerHis Account of John Smith's Advice, and of the Proceedings of a Committee, at the Yearly-meeting in 1764Contemplations on the Nature of true Wisdom, occasioned by hearing of the Cruelty of the Indians to their CaptivesHis visiting the Families of Friends…
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Chapter 10

1769, 1770 Bodily IndispositionExercise of his Mind for the Good of the People in the West IndiesCommunicates to Friends his Concern to visit some of those IslandsPreparations to embarkConsiderations on the Trade to the West IndiesRelease from his Concern and return HomeReligious EngagementsSickness, and Exercise of his Mind therein Twelfth of Third Month, 1769.—Having for…
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Chapter 11

1772 Embarks at Chester, with Samuel Emlen, in a Ship bound for LondonExercise of Mind respecting the Hardships of the SailorsConsiderations on the Dangers of training Youth to a Seafaring LifeThoughts during a Storm at SeaArrival in London. Having been some time under a religious concern to prepare for crossing the seas, in order to…
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Chapter 12

1772 Attends the Yearly Meeting in LondonThen proceeds towards YorkshireVisits Quarterly and other Meetings in the Counties of Hertford, Warwick, Oxford, Nottingham, York, and WestmorelandReturns to YorkshireInstructive Observations and LettersHears of the Decease of William HuntSome Account of himThe Author's Last Illness and Death at York On the 8th of Sixth Month, 1772, we landed…
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