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December

December

Editorial

The Light of ReasonDecember 1904Published MonthlyEdited by James Allen Vol. VI. December 1st, 1904 No. 6 We shall mount, for the Ideal of today becomes the Actual of tomorrow.—J. S. F. Miller The attention of our readers is particularly drawn to the announcement which appears on the first advertisement page…
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A Christmas Chime

The persistent survival of Christmas as a special season of joy and social festivity—"a season," as Washington Irving so aptly expresses it, "of regenerated feeling"—is largely significant and suggests many lessons, of which a few may profitably engage our thoughts now that the time of its observance is drawing nigh.…
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Heaven (Poem)

In the Visions of the agesI am evermore reflected;In the precepts of the sagesI am spoken and rejected.I can suffer no distortion,Sin and sorrow cannot stain me;Fixed and faultless in proportion,He must bend who would attain me. The whole universe in which we live is arranged in such a fashion…
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Inspiration

....So to live is heaven;May I reach that purest heaven, be to other soulsThe cup of strength in some great agony,Enkindle generous ardor, feed pure love,Beget the smiles that have no cruelty;Be the sweet presence of a good diffused,And in diffusion ever more intenseSo shall I join the choir invisibleWhose…
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Joy Cometh in the Morning (Poem)

Joy cometh in the morning,Oh! dry those doubting tears;'Tis e'er before the dawningThe darkest hour appears. Thinkst thou the sun has vanishedBecause 'tis out of sight?Thinkst thou that night has banishedFor aye the morning light? Oh! waken from the sadnessWhich faithlessness has wrought;How could we learn of gladnessIf not by…
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Look Not For the Evil

It is a truism to say that we recognize most clearly in other people the characteristics which we ourselves possess, and the principle needs little demonstration, for one never feels an implicit trust in the man who is constantly speaking of how deceitful he finds others; neither is one likely…
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Refinement

Move upward, working out the beast,And let the ape and tiger die.—Tennyson All culture is a getting away from the beast. Evolution itself is a refining process, and the unwritten laws of society inhere in the evolutionary law. Education is intellectual culture; religion is moral culture. The scholar is engaged…
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Are You Well Bred?

If you are well-bred—You will be kind.You will not use slang.You will try to make others happy.You will not be shy or self-conscious.You will never indulge in ill-natured gossip.You will never forget the respect due to age.You will not swagger or boast of your achievements.You will think of others before…
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The Light of Love

A Dream It was a bare open plain that stretched before me, the wind seemed to have swept even the last dead leaf of Autumn from its cold expanse. To the right stood a bold piece of grey jagged rock, which almost looked as if it had been suddenly hurled…
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If We Knew (Poem)

If we knew the cares and crossesCrowding round our neighbor's way;If we knew the little losses,Sorely grievous, day by day;Would we then so often chide himFor his lack of thrift and gain,Leaving on his hearth a shadow,Leaving on his life a stain? If we knew the clouds above us,Held by…
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Character

Character is a manifestation of inner reality —it is the outcome of the real life of the individual, the result of man's effort to express himself. Character is an effect, and only by tracing back within ourselves can we discover the springs of action in human life, and when we…
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The Limitations of Man

A man's limitations are the result of his imperfections. Proceeding from the weak indulgence of lower tendencies, they manifest as the inadequacy of undeveloped functions to attain a desired end, the painful thwarting of misdirected energies, or the utter helplessness of wasted powers. It is not that the dispensations of…
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Cooperation (Poem)

Am thy brother's limitation,Be he lame or be he blind;Whatsoe'er thy place or station,'Tis thy duty to be kind. Be it deafness, be it blindness—Each hath some deficiency;In thy turn accept the kindnessWhich thy brother offers thee. Let us trust in one another,Give and take of gentle deed—Each to each…
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Work While it is Day

Not all who seem to fail, have failed indeed!—Richard Chenevix Trench Do you know what will make you work beautiful? Perhaps it is monotonous, dull, and uneventful, and often tries your patience, and your health. It is so easy to see life beautiful when everything around you is for your…
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Charity (Poem)

Judge not with rash or cruel thoughtThe one who falleth by the way;Guard thou thy tongue, stretch forth thy hand,And help his downward course to stay. We see the sin, we do not seeThe travail of the soul that fell,The racking pain of questioned right,The darkened hour that tolled its…
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Originality of Character

That all people are not alike is often admitted, but few realize that this statement involves that everyone possesses something in his or her nature not to be found in another. That something, be it good or evil, great or small, strong or weak, is character. Not merely is it…
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Gems of Thought From German Thinkers

What you have not given up you have not gained. —Schiller If a man remains modest, both when praised and censured, then believe me he is true. —Jean Paul Wisdom is a precious stone; its brilliancy showing forth most beautifully when set with meekness. —Klopstock Whoever strives for wisdom, but…
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Precious Thoughts

Manners give the whole form and colour to our lives.—Burke Silence, when nothing need be said, is the eloquence of discretion. —Bovee By patience and perseverance the mulberry leaf becomes silk. —Chinese Proverb He who is firm in will moulds the world to himself. —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Speak clearly…
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Forget the Past (Poem)

Forgetting those things which are behind.—Phil. III. 13 Forget the past! 'Twill ne'er return,'Tis gone forever now ;Does not its memory bid thee learnHow faithless was its vow?However rashly it was bought,Howe'er 'twas prized or dear,It is not worth an anxious thoughtOr e'en one bitter tear. Forget the past! 'Tis…
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Our Talk With Correspondents

W. S.—Your letter is as follows:—"Your reply to 'F. R.' in this month's (November) Light of Reason does not seem to be a sufficient answer to his questions, and, I feel sure, will not satisfy him. To say 'The man of Truth avoids beliefs about things' is, to my mind,…
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The "Light of Reason" Gatherings

West Longdon Group—On November 1st, Mr. Charles Brodie Patterson, the Editor of "Mind," New York, who is now in England, was with us. There were about 30 members of both Groups and some guests present. At the wish of Mr. Patterson I read a short article, choosing a piece from…
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Reviews of Books

More Popular Fallacies, by Quillet; published by Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, London, E.C. The author of this book tells us to regard it as "a modem supplement" to Lamb's "Popular Fallacies," and forestalls any possible charge of egotism that may be brought against him by a tactful reference to…
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