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August

August

Editorial

The Light of ReasonAugust 1904Published MonthlyEdited by James AllenVol. VI. August 1st, 1904 No. 2 What we have seen in the realm of nature is paralleled by what is occurring in the realm of mind.—J. H. Tuckwell The Rev. J. H. Tuckwell's article on "Miracle and Law" in our present…
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Miracle and Law

That miracle in the sense of violation, suspension, or contravention of law never occurs we need not hesitate to affirm. Nature's laws are the expression of the thought, the volition, the purpose of the all-inclusive Eternal Spirit, who is the same yesterday and today and forever. The revulsion the keenest…
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Humility (Poem)

As through the golden corn I wentTo pluck the ears at harvest time,I noticed those that lowliest bentWere in their prime. If one should in a garden seekWhere sweetest fragrance might be found,He'd choose the violet, hidden, meek,Low, near the ground. When stars are shedding through the nightTheir feeble radiance…
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The Gospel of Character

"A single hour of justice is worth seventy years of prayer." So says the Koran, and such thoughts and sentiments are to be found in every great world religion. There is no religion higher than truth! This is certainly to the point. The Gospel of Character is the one universal…
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A Little Sketch (Poem)

What this troubled old world needsIs less of quibbling over creeds,Fewer words and better deeds. Less of "Thus and so shall youThink and act and say and do,"More of "How may I be true?" Less of wrangling over text;Less of creed and code perplexed;More of charity unvexed. Less of shouting:…
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Justice

At some period or other of our life there must come a time when we feel an intense longing to come to the bottom of things, to sift them through and do away with the dross. We have, that is, the majority of us, been brought up in some form…
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Conventionalism

Every individual that starts out to think and act according to his own interior light, meets with many apparent difficulties of an undefined character. Apparent, because few difficulties are so real that they cannot be overcome, and it is only the feeling of impossibility which paralyses effort, and prevents many…
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Interrogative (Poem)

What is the gift of speech without a noble mind?Where is the grandeur of power if we have not learned to be kind?What is the good of giving just for the sake of show?And is there strength in saying "Yes" because we're afraid to say "No?" Self-conquest is the greatest…
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Echoes of the Past

PetrarchWhittier said, "No voice, however feeble, lifted up for truth dies." Six hundred years have passed since Francis Petrarch, poet, philosopher, and man of letters, lifted up his voice for truth, and that it was neither small nor feeble, is demonstrated by the echo of his words, which has not…
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Work

The little garden which fell to my care a few weeks ago has provided an illustration of one of the great principles of life. I should like to state the thought here. At the time named, the piece of ground was very untidy. I set to work, cleared away the…
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What Have We Done Today (Poem)

We shall do so much in the years to come,But what have we done today?We shall give our gold in a princely sum,But what did we give today?We shall lift the heart and dry the tear,We shall plant a hope in the place of fear,We shall speak the words of…
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Thought-Power

That low man seeks a little thing to do,—Sees it and does it.This high man with a great thing to pursue,Dies 'ere he knows it.—Robert Browning Thoughts are electric currents from the human battery of the brain—invisible realities, as all the greatest realities are. Thought-force is the nucleus of each…
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The Trivial Round (Poem)

If life ordain seclusion as thy lot,If thou dost dwell aloof from humankind—Lament thou not,But in such limits still thy mission find. Yearn not for chances to "the world" improve:Nor yet in search of these in suffering go:Learn just to loveThose nigh to thee—contented it is so.
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Possibilities

Emerson asks, "Who can set bounds to the possibilities of man?" and tells us, "we are adapted to infinity." Our actual life is often so far below that which should be possible that we do not wonder when a saint and philosopher like Paul sends up the bitter cry: "Oh,…
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Service (Poem)

Today you wrote a letterTo one who calls you friend;Is any man the betterFor words which you have penned? Is any home the brighterBecause you passed that way?Is any heart the lighterThat you have lived today? Life is not worth the living—As it so quickly flies—Unless we aye are givingThe…
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The Soul's Yearning

Blessedness for man is assured in the yearning of the soul for a higher and yet higher state of consciousness. It suffices not to have been brought up to hold certain forms of belief; because the breath of life—the soul's own native air—can never be confined by the terms of…
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Grasp the Truth (Poem)

Let there be many windows in your soul, That all the glory of the universe May beautify it. Not the narrow pane Of one poor creed can catch the radiant rays That shine from countless sources. Tear away The blinds of superstition: let the light Pour through fair windows broad…
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The Three Paths of Guidance

Get wisdom, get understanding; and with all thy getting, get understanding.—Proverbs 4:7 Three distinct paths are walked by men in their search for Truth, and along which they seek spiritual guidance, and these paths I will call:—       Phenomena,      Mysticism,      Wisdom He who is…
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Some Sayings of Ramakrishna

What you wish others to do, do yourself. There is no difference between pure knowledge and pure love. The teachings of all the wise men of the world are essentially one and the same. Remain always strong and steadfast in thy own faith, but eschew all bigotry and intolerance. When…
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True Work

Remember it is often to those men and women who have given their time, their work, and sometimes their lives, that we owe much of the light, and much of the comforts and joys that continually open out to us greater Truths. We know not always how they have struggled,…
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Gems of Thought From German Thinkers

Blessed is he who feels the greatness of others and makes it his own by love. —Grillparzer A poor mind indeed is he who is ashamed to borrow Truth from others. —Lessing If you have failed do not despair, but follow repentance with a better deed. —Jean Paul Surely it…
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Our Talk With Correspondents

W. S.—Your letter is as follows:—"In relation to the response of gratitude for loving services, I do not find that love and gratitude invariably follow loving services. There are persons who do not return gratitude for services, or love to those who have loved them. I think there are exceptions,…
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The "Light of Reason" Gatherings

North London Group—On June 26th a muster of nineteen members and friends went for a walk through the fields of Finchley and Totteridge, occasional halts being made for readings from favorite authors. A very pleasant time was spent. The usual meeting was held on July 2nd, when articles were read…
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Reviews of Books

I, Me, and my Body, by Louie Stacey, published by Stead, Danby & Co., 10 Cheniston Gardens, Kensington, London, W. We cannot speak too highly of this little treatise of thirty pages. It is written in the form of question and answer between a "Student" and a "Teacher," and, though…
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Reviews of Magazines

Occasional Papers, published monthly at 3, Lansdowne Crescent, Bournemouth is a new magazine of forty pages of excellent literary matter printed in clear type on good book-paper. In the June issue Clive Holland writes sympathetically on Thomas Hardy and the Wessex Novels; Duncan Hume, in a statistical article, answers the…
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