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From Land's End to John O'Groats

From Land's End to John O'Groats

Being an Account of His Record Walk, in which He Accomplished 908 1/2 Miles in 16 Days, 21 Hours, and 33 Minutes

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Preface

Because Vegetarianism has done so much for me, I am willing to give my best to the advancement of its principles.I do not suggest that feats of endurance in themselves constitute the highest form of propaganda, but they have the advantage of being very real argument for the cause.This book is sent forth at the…
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From Land’s End to John O'Groat’s

A feat of endurance of such magnitude as the one under notice, must only be undertaken by a man with a wide knowledge of athletics, and in the finest trained condition. Otherwise the result may prove disastrous.Even with my varied athletic exper1ence, I had, at the outset, greatly under-estimated the task before me. Wisdom born…
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Preparing for the Ordeal

In the month of June, 1904, spec1al training was commenced. My garden work at home claimed my attention as usual, for Nature will brook no delay, nor await the convenience of any one. Honestly, the training walks were anything but enjoyable, as a rule. Although I knew that the 150 to 200 miles which I…
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Sunday, September 4th

Was observed as a day of rest. All record-breakers, I believe, rest on Sunday. It was a most anxious day for me. Here I was awaiting an attendant whom I had only met on one occasion; all previous arrangements wanting overhauling. However, after months of training and calculating, I did not intend to be daunted…
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Sunday, September 11th

The record week of the walk had been one of anxiety in many ways. To walk 320 miles with the absence of any proper arrangement for food was anything but satisfactory. My attendant had done his best, and done it well, but he was human, and could not be expected to do two or three…
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Review of the Walk

WeatherTaken on the whole the weather conditions during the walk may be classed as average. The first week was far too hot for comfort; the second was too wet; but I much prefer wet weather to hot, providing I had proper attention—say a motor car carry1ng a few suits of clothes and necessary small items,…
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Appendix

At the conclusion of his walk Mr. George H. Allen was submitted to medical examination, and the following is the doctor's certificate:— "George H. Allen, 37 years, 16th June, 1904, about 9 stone 4 Ibs. 909 ½ miles, Land's End to John o' Groat's; August 29th, 5 a.m. Did not walk any on the two…
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